Author Archives: julieneu

Light the World from Lyric Kinard

I was so touched by what Lyric Kinard wrote in her most recent newsletter that I wanted to share it (with permission):

Be the change that you wish to see in the world.
Mahatma Ghandhi

I have a simple message for you today. With turmoil and conflict everywhere, it is up to each of us to be the light, to be the good, to be the change. We can’t sit back in fear and wait. Nobody else is going to make it better for us.

Alone, we cannot change the whole world but we certainly can bring comfort and peace to one individual. Every small act of kindness makes a difference. If enough people do one small thing, and then do one more small thing, and one more – the world WILL change.

You are a quilter.
You are an amazingly creative and generous person.
What we do is not frivolous, it makes a difference.

How will you shine your light?

Lyric Kinard, Artist, Author, and educator, can be found at www.LyricKinard.com
You can sign up for her monthly newsletter here.
© 2016 Lyric Montgomery Kinard. All rights reserved.

 

Creative Play Newsletter Vol.2, Issue 5 – With Gratitude

November is apparently “Gratitude Month.”  I don’t remember when it was officially created, but I have seen announcements of that popping up more frequently over the last few years. With Thanksgiving occurring in a few weeks, “Gratitude Month” does make sense. So, I want to take the time to say that I am grateful to all of you. Thank you all for your support over the last year and a half as I went on my personal journey into my creativity and officially launched Creative Play™.

I have often felt so very alone in my journey. I thought I was the only person who was unhappy and that I just needed to put on my big girl pants and go to the office with a smile on my face and work my hardest, even in the jobs that I loathed.  I thought that “real” jobs are what adulthood is all about and doing what you love is either a fantasy or it’s something for a select few lucky people. As I started to believe that maybe I could be one of those lucky people and that I actually deserved work that I love and happiness to boot, you all supported me. You encouraged me to stay on my path (though I still don’t really know where that path is going!) and for that, I thank you.

Then, I began to think that maybe I wasn’t so alone after all and that I wasn’t the only one in need of a little creative fulfillment in life. When Creative Play™ was just the stirrings of an idea, you all supported me again. You shared your stories with me. You told me how valuable you thought this pursuit was and encouraged me to believe that I have something to offer the world through this. I am grateful for that.

Your support and encouragement has helped me believe that happiness is possible and that I deserve to do work that brings me happiness. I am eternally grateful to you for that.

Challenging Work

Today, I begin the task of gathering the name of each victim of the Las Vegas shooting to  create a new set of blocks for my Victims Quilt. As I type each one, I am looking at their photos and reading about who they were. I am reading about husbands who died shielding their wives and about so many children who have lost parents. I have typed only five and I already have tears in my eyes. Without a doubt, today’s work is that made that much more difficult knowing that another 26 people lost their lives last night in yet another shooting. Will this ever end?

Protest #6 – In Our Sights

I doubt this one needs a lot of explanation. It’s pages from The New York Times on October 3rd and 4th, 2017, overlaid with a gray sheer and quilted with black thread in concentric circles. The green gun sight image is appliqued on top.

I used actual newspapers, knowing that this piece will wear over time. I expect the pages to yellow and tear to show the passage of time. I hope that the time that passes will bring change in the use of guns in the U.S., but I fear that time will pass with little change at all.

art quilt of newspaper headlines from Las Vegas Shooting, overlaid with green gun sight image

In Our Sights, 2017. 36″ x 32″

Creative Play Newsletter Vol. 2:Issue 4 – Play For Your Authentic Self

I started reading a book called “Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul” by Stuart Brown, M.D., founder of the National Institute for Play, (Who knew there was such a thing?) and Christopher Vaughan.  I am completely riveted.  I’m learning about all of the benefits of play for kids to develop problem solving and social skills, and for adults in preventing brain degeneration. I’m finding the topic fascinating, but of course my main interest is in the benefits of creative play. Interestingly, it was in a chapter about kids and play where I found the phrase that stopped me in my tracks.

Brown and Vaughan write, “. . . the self that emerges through play is the core, authentic self” (emphasis in the original, pg.107).  “That’s it exactly!” I thought.  As an adult engaged in creative play, it may not be that the authentic self is emerging, but rather re-emerging, but that’s exactly how I felt as I began to play more and get back in tune with my creativity. I finally felt right again, like I was back in my own body rather than looking at myself from the outside wondering who I had become. As I got more comfortable with my authentic self (whom I had not known in a VERY long time), the most amazing things happened. I was finding inspiration on an almost daily basis and creating art that for the first time, really spoke to me. I also began feeling joy, an unexpected but incredible benefit.

In Our Sights

I started a new quilt this week. I’m still reeling from this week’s news of yet another mass shooting, the most deadly of all, and I am not yet ready to start typing the names of victims to add them to the Victims Quilt. But, I still found myself sick over the shooting and I couldn’t get it out of my mind. I went to bed the other night drawing gun sight patterns. I originally thought that I would create a block that looked like gun sights to create a traditional quilt, in the style of the Double T block used by the Temperance movement. When I awoke in the morning, however, this is the quilt that I had in mind:

Victims

After 15 months of work, my Victims quilt is complete. 

The finished quilt is 112″ square and is too large for me to adequately photograph. Each 8″ block contains the name of a victim of a major mass shooting event in the U.S. I chose to focus on events that claimed the lives of more than ten people in one day. Those events are:

  • Columbine High School, CO (4/20/1999) – 13 people killed
  • Virginia Tech, VA (4/16/2007) – 32 people killed
  • Binghamton, NY (4/3/2009) – 13 people killed
  • Fort Hood, TX (11/5/2009) – 13 people killed
  • Aurora, CO (7/20/2012) – 12 people killed
  • Sandy Hook Elementary, CT (12/14/2012) – 27 people killed
  • Washington, D.C. (9/16/2013) – 12 people killed
  • San Bernadino, CA (12/2/2015) – 14 people killed
  • Orlando, FL (6/12/2016) – 49 people killed

The block designs are representative of the state in which the shooting occurred.

 

5 Ways to Play Today

So far this week, I have shared with you why I started Creative Play™ in the first place and talked about some of the falsehoods around creativity (a.k.a. some of the reasons I was so slow to see the value of play). I hope that I now have you thinking, “Hmm. Maybe I should do something.” Today, I am going to suggest a couple of things that you can do to get started right now:

  1. Doodle – No matter where you are or what supplies you have on hand, doodling is something that you can do. You only need a scrap of paper and some writing implement. Take 5 minutes, turn away from your screen, and just doodle. Draw lines, draw shapes, make dots, it doesn’t matter. At the end of 5 minutes, see how you feel. A little less tense? 
  2. Color – You may have succumbed to the adult coloring book trend and have one lying around. Even if you haven’t, coloring pages are easy to find online and print (Google Free Coloring Pages). You probably also have some crayons or markers around somewhere to use. If not, the stationery aisle of your local grocery store or pharmacy will have them.
  3. Make a Flip Book – Did you make flip books as a kid? You draw something on the front page of a stack of sticky notes. On the next page, you draw the same thing, but alter it slightly. You keep doing this, making small alterations to your drawing, and as you flip through the stack of pages, the images look like they are moving. Supplies needed – just a stack of sticky notes and a pen.
  4. Find Letters – Go for a walk with your camera phone. If it’s possible to walk outside, go out. (Fresh air does wonders.) Look for what’s called “Found Letters.”  They are things or pieces of things that look like letters, but aren’t type.  For example, the J in the handle of an umbrella or an A in the supports of a sign. (Google Found Letters) Look for your initials and take pictures when you find them.
  5. Build Something – Using supplies you have on-hand, build something. Create a chain of paperclips or twist them into sculptures. Make a pencil tower. Use colored push pins to fashion a design on your bulletin board or cubicle wall. See what can be done with the change in your pocket.

And of course, #6 Sign up for 30 Days of Creative Play™. No supplies are needed to get started so you can begin today. Use coupon code Play15 for 15% off the class fee until 12/15/17.

Please feel free to share your doodles, paper clip sculptures and other creative play on the Creative Play Date Facebook page. We love to see what you create!

Creativity Falsehood #3 – “I am too old to play.”

I had been using this excuse myself for so long that I really had to step back and think about it. I’d just become so accustomed to it that it felt like truth.  When I gave it some more thought I realized that this idea is a really common message we hear, either explicitly or implicitly, as we grow up.  We live in a culture that highly values work: we don’t take our vacations; we’re afraid to be caught leaving work early; and we commonly answer the question “How are you?” with the reply, “Busy.” Play is considered something for children and part of becoming an adult is leaving those childish pursuits behind. I suspect that losing our creative confidence as we move into adulthood is part of this.

Though child’s play and adult play may take different forms and serve different purposes, it is no less important. When I started creative play, I brought some joy back into my life, my stress went down, and I also started being more playful in general, which I am sure my family appreciates.  The Help Guide lists the following benefits of play:

  • Relieve stress
  • Improve brain function
  • Stimulate the mind and boost creativity
  • Improve relationships and your connection with others
  • Keep you feeling young and energetic.

So the real truth is that you are never too old to play, but a surefire way to make yourself feel old is to have a life that is all work and no play. I’m tired of feeling old, aren’t you?

 

Creativity Falsehood #2 – “I don’t have time to play.”

Believe me, I understand this one! As I wrote on Monday, I hardly took time to play as a kid. As an adult? Forget it! I didn’t allow myself time to play until all of my work was done and my work was almost never done. Finally, however, as I have gotten older and wiser, I realized that I was making the choice to work instead of play and that I could make a different choice.

Time is a funny thing. Every day, we have the same 24 hours, but some days that doesn’t feel like it’s enough time and some days, it feels like too much. How we use our time and what we define as our priorities is in our control for the most part. What was great about finally realizing that was that it also meant that I could control whether or not I had time for play and whether or not it was a priority. Once I made my own play time a priority, it became easier to find 15 minutes for myself. And, yes, sometimes those play times were stolen moments, like the 15 minutes of coloring I did one night while my daughter was in the tub. I prefer to have my play time when it’s quiet, but that hadn’t happened on that particular day so I took what I could get and still found my time relaxing and better for my blood pressure than checking Facebook.

What I also realized was that when I said to myself “I don’t have the time to play,” what I really meant was “I don’t consider myself enough of a priority in my own life to do something for myself until everyone and everything else is taken care of first.”  That was a stunning realization for me. I knew I was not completely self-absorbed, but I also did not think that I was a self-negating door mat either. And really, though I won’t stand for anyone else making me a door mat, I had been doing it to myself for years without realizing it.  That was something I could change too.